Slut walking taking the world by storm

The first slut walk i ever heard of was in Australia. I had no idea what it was supposed to mean. I simply thought that it was a walk to promote or to fight for the rights of the sex worker. Apparently it’s much deeper than that. The latest one to come to my attention was a slut walk in Brazil. Slut walks are simply marches against the objectification of women. One can both agree and disagree with the whole concept of objectification entirely. Am I saying that women deserved to be raped or disrespected? Hell no. What right does anyone have to say that a woman would not have had something happen to her if she didn’t wear those miniskirts? It’s not only insulting but it sounds to me like shifting the blame as is custom with people who are accustomed to finding scape goats from most of their slip-ups in life.

Mariana Freitas’ coverage of the slut walks of Brazil explains the situation on Global voices here.

While many will want to take the walks and supporters of them as protesters (there are male participants in these events as well) labelling men as general misogynists, which i don’t believe is the case, one must admit to the stereotypes that have been instilled in us of gender perception and inequality are still alive and strong today. These protesters are to be commended even though the true courage in feminism is long past in a different era.

I’d like to outline an excerpt of a text that highlights some criticism for extreme feminism that I must agree with, despite my distaste for may of the author’s general philosophies.

“Men have dived to the bottom of the ocean and drowned themselves for pearls. They have suffocated in mines, all to pay tribute to woman. Men have risked and lost their lives making the world safe and comfortable for women. I see feminists as trivialising woman’s grandeur. Their ideal is a frantic career mom with a attache case.”

This is a quote from Camille Paglia, writer of the controversial Sexual Personae, who has made a few enemies of feminists, with good reason in many cases, in her career. She uses art and film as examples of mediums of reverence for femininity rather than objectification. Interesting, no?

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~ by louella001 on June 27, 2011.

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